USS Phoenix
Logo
USS Phoenix forum / Star Trek / CBS, Paramount, Abrams, zabawki - czyli przyszłość Treka...
 Strona:  ««  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  »» 
Autor Wiadomość
Q__
Moderator
#121 - Wysłana: 3 Paź 2014 14:46:03 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Queerbot

Queerbot:
Ale doczekują się jakiejkolwiek odpowiedzi?

Zawsze tej samej - co ciekawe częściej od współdyskutantów, choć czasem i od kogoś z ekipy... Że będzie...


EDIT: wracając jednak do dziwnych ruchów CBSu, okazuje się, że było tego więcej; z opisu SF Debris na TV Tropes:

"On May 12, 2011, all of his Star Trek reviews were removed from Youtube, as a pre-emptive measure when CBS (which has been cracking down severely on other Star Trek fan channels as well) filed a claim against his "Trials and Tribble-ations" review. As the BBC has already done the same with his Red Dwarf reviews, under the Youtube "three strikes" policy, he now has only one strike remaining. As with Red Dwarf and other non-Trek reviews, they will now be uploaded exclusively to his blip.tv account, though he will continue to use his Youtube for trailers."
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Website/SFDe bris
Q__
Moderator
#122 - Wysłana: 12 Paź 2014 17:53:24 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Bardzo istotny tekst o przyszłości Treka, nadesłany mi przez fluora (gdyby wszyscy Trekerzy, którzy piszą ze mną na GG pisali i na forum, to by wrócił wiek złoty). Pozwolę sobie zacytować w całości:

Why “Star Trek” is Paramount’s Marvel and they don’t even know it…
October 9, 2014
by Mark A. Altman

CREATING A STAR TREK MCU

For anyone who has followed the film and television business in the last few years, they know one thing is true: franchises are king. Whether it’s a remake, a reimagining, a book series or a comic book, this is the political capital that gets projects greenlit. Having a great script is only a small part of the equation (too small, regrettably). What marketable element is going to allow the film or series to open in China, Russia, Germany, Latin America and other territories around the world in a universe in which stars mean virtually nothing anymore, but the cartoon you watched when you were seven can easily get a $200 million budget is what’s important. It’s one reason that Paramount has been so aggressive about marketing Star Trek overseas given its lackluster performance abroad in previous incarnations (Star Trek IV was called only The Voyage Home in Europe and even opened with a brief Star Trek primer to get fans up-to-warp speed.
It didn’t help).

Every studio wants and needs its franchises (much like Captain Kirk needed his pain). Disney not only has the Marvel films, but Star Wars and the Theme Park spin-off’s like Pirates of the Caribbean, Warner Bros. has the DC Comics heroes and Harry Potter franchises, Fox has X-Men and, now, Apes, Sony is laboring under the delusion that Spider-Man and its associated spin-off’s is a vital franchise (although if anyone can pull it off, Drew Goddard probably can) and Universal which only had Fast & The Furious and Jason Bourne is doing a full court press to revive its moribund Universal Monsters into a 21st century mega-franchise. And while Paramount has the critically reviled, but box-office behemoth Transformers, they have another franchise that potentially can rule them all: Star Trek.

And yet you would never know it from the way in which the brand has been shabbily developed over the last ten years. Since the cancellation of Enterprise, Star Trek went into a semi-permanent state of hibernation until it was revived successfully by J.J. Abrams introducing the iconic characters to a new generation of fans around the world. Whether you love or loathe the films (or just enjoy them a helluva lot), one thing that is disappointing is the fact that it took four years between the first two films and, at least, another three until the next sequel. In movie years, this is an eternity. And there is literally nothing else to fill the void in between unless you’re one of the 12 people that still reads the novels. The fact is it’s time for Paramount and CBS to start treating Star Trek like a business and not just an annuity they can cash in every few years. They have their own Marvel, their own Star Wars, their own Guardians of the Galaxy, but it’s time to start treating Star Trek like Marvel and DC and devise, dare I say it, a transmedia strategy that delivers on the promise of this franchise which will not only satisfy the millions of fans craving more Star Trek but also fill the studio coffers many times over.

MGM’s 50th anniversary celebration of James Bond was a textbook marketing strategy executed with incredible finesse in which they revisited the catalog, introduced new licensing programs which culminated in the release of one of the best and most successful films in the series, Skyfall and created a new generation of Bond fans. It’s also worth noting that Skyfall was helmed by a director who loved James Bond. And with the impending 50th anniversary of Star Trek, the time for Paramount to get its act together when it comes to Trek is now.

Years ago, the failure of the TV series, Enterprise, was erroneously attributed by deposed Trek overlord Rick Berman to the preponderance of too much Star Trek. The fact is anyone who knew anything about Star Trek knew at the time that the eroding ratings and declining box-office of films like Insurrection and Nemesis had nothing to do with a lack of interest in Star Trek, they had to do with the fact people weren’t interested in seeing bad Star Trek. They were abandoning a Star Trek that had become dull and formulaic and mired in old-fashioned storytelling whereas Star Trek always succeeded best when it was audacious and forward-thinking. Star Trek was at its best when it boldly went.

But how do you overcome the internal problems at the studio with bifurcated ownership between Paramount Pictures and CBS Television with feuding fiefdoms unable to cooperate until now, living in mutual fear and loathing of each other? Well, I’m glad you asked, here’s some thoughts…

Star Trek needs its Kevin Feige…

So what does it mean to turn Star Trek into Marvel? The first thing Marvel decided to do when they chose to finance and produce their own properties was they hired someone who knew and loved Marvel, Kevin Feige. And Kevin put together a team of

writers and producers who functioned much as John Lasseter and his team did at Pixar insuring quality control over the films and TV series (what Jeph Loeb is doing with Netflix is nothing short of Marvel-ous, yes, I love the puns, or as the Brits might say, brilliant) which is why, with the exception of Iron Man 2 which was still a financial success, Marvel hasn’t produced a clunker yet. And what was dubbed its most off-concept and riskiest venture yet has turned out to boast the biggest R.O.I., the medium-budgeted Guardians of the Galaxy. Yes, they’ve still been tentative in some regards, not greenlighting a $30 million R-rated Black Widow film and where’s my Moon Knight TV series, for instance, instead continuing to focus on mega-budget pictures which inevitably involve powerful crystals that can enslave the universe as their macguffin, but their films continue to get better and better each time and out-gross each film before it. And, in television, despite the mixed reception earned by S.H.I.E.L.D. the show has revived creatively and new series like the World War II-set Agent Carter (yes!) and the Netflix shows like Luke Cage, Jessica Jones and Daredevil seem even more promising.

And even if the studio can find its own Kevin Feige (and, I for one, would love to see Rod Roddenberry involved as a consultant in some capacity in this process as man who’s protective, but not slavish, to his family legacy) which is essential to overseeing the Star Trek media empire which currently has no strategic plan at all (or as Captain Willard in Apocalypse Now might say, “I don’t see any method at all”), who’d be the showrunners tasked with making the new films and series? It’d be easy to offer up familiar names like Ron Moore and Bryan Fuller, who could both do a remarkable job in the Trek trenches again unencumbered by their previous restraints and putting all they’ve learned in the intervening years to good use. But both are probably more Captain Kirk’s than Admiral Nogura’s, they’d want to be making the shows and not just overlording them. And I strongly suggest one or both of these television auteurs should get the helm of a Trek series. Hell, wouldn’t it even be fascinating to see the erudite Nick Meyer take a crack at reinterpreting the Holy Scripture. But there’s also some huge Trek fans out there who you’d never associate with the franchise and whose end result I couldn’t begin to imagine which would make it even more exciting. Some of the names that come to mind are the man behind “The Negron Factor,” Mad Men’s Matt Weiner (who used to hang out with the Star Trek writers back when he was on the lot doing Becker) and uber fan Seth McFarlane as well as filmmakers like Bryan Singer. But you’d be shocked to know how many established TV showrunners and Co-Ep’s are major Trekkers who would do virtually anything (and work for less than their quote) to shepherd a new Star Trek to the screen. Much like AMC’s infamous bake-off’s, it’d be great for CBS Studios to hear a myriad pitches from some of the town’s most accomplished writers to hear their thoughts on new directions for the franchise we couldn’t even begin to contemplate. Star Trek doesn’t just have to be a captain and his crew sitting on the bridge of a starship going where no one has gone before, but it might help to start off with this. But before that can happen, Paramount and CBS need to put together a brain trust to focus as consultants and their very own in-house Tom Hagen consigliore’s to help them understand, exploit and manage (in the best sense of the word) their crown jewel with a phaser-proof five year plan to start.
Q__
Moderator
#123 - Wysłana: 12 Paź 2014 17:54:38 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Star Trek needs to come back to television…

The biggest problem with Star Trek’s return to television remains the nature of the rights split between Paramount and CBS. While Paramount controls the movie rights, CBS owns television and most of the consumer products licensing.

And you have two ten-ton gorillas with whom the franchise’s fate rests: Brad Grey and Les Moonves. Now the fact is in today’s TV environment, CBS is not going to allow one of their most valuable properties to be produced for a network they don’t own and this is the biggest problem. For everyone who thinks Netflix is going to step in and be a savior here, there’s very little chance of that happening (or rather be allowed). If Star Trek is going to come back, it’s going to be on a CBS-controlled entity, perhaps with a Netflix or Amazon streaming component to offset the costs. The problem here is Star Trek does not fit CBS profile at all, it skews younger and doesn’t fit the CBS demo. NCIS: Vulcan is not in the cards. But here’s the good news, you know where it could work? Showtime, which is also owned by CBS. And here’s where it gets better; you know what almost every cable channel has been looking for this development season: a sci-fi Game of Thrones. True that. And guess what fits those parameters? Star Trek. And I’m not talking about the old teaser plus five act and a tag Star Trek, but Star Trek in the 21st century. A Star Trek that goes back to world-building, boldly going and intergalactic geo-politics. A Star Trek that is sophisticated and boasts cutting edge visual effects and storytelling. That’s the kind of Star Trek series, with perhaps a 10 or 13 episode order that Showtime might air. And, if not, Paramount is also a partner in EPIX so it’s possible, and maybe even probable, if CBS were the studio partner, they might be willing to produce it for EPIX which has so little market penetration with such a low-bar for success, it might be the equivalent of what first-run syndication was for Next Generation 25 years ago.

But, you know, that’s not the only channel CBS is a partner in with Warner Bros. They also own, gulp, the CW. Now, I know what you’re thinking? No way. But, for those of you who haven’t noticed lately CW has sort of turned into Syfy Channel, Jr. Now why is that? Because in the age of diminished ratings, genre fans are some of the most loyal fans out there and sci-fi also is one of the few genres that still repeats so it’s perfect for streaming and home video. But what would Star Trek on the CW look like. Obviously, it’s a very different show that on Showtime or EPIX. The obvious answer is the dreaded Starfleet Academy which instantly evokes groans from most fans. But that doesn’t have to be the case. One of the finest episodes of The Next Generation was “The First Duty,” which almost entirely takes place at Starfleet Academy. I’ve always thought that a Starfleet Academy show which is more akin to The Paper Chase than Beverly Hills 90210 could be a terrific show. College is the crucible in which one’s adult life and worldview is often formed so a sophisticated and smart Starfleet Academy could absolutely work and it would certainly be a good companion series to a Star Trek set on a starship on another outlet (we’re one big happy fleet, you know), perhaps targeting a younger demo than another series and serve as a gateway drug, much as the J.J. movies did, for non-Trekkers.

Color Me Mine

So we’ve already talked about continuing the movie series, adding at least two new television series. What else? Perhaps a re-imagination of Next Generation in the way J.J. handled Classic Trek in the new universe. Perhaps not. A new animated series is long overdue and is an opportunity to revisit absent friends whether it’s new voyages of the original starship Enterprise or Next Generation or other seminal moments in the Star Trek universe. But as they say with the ginsu knife, that’s not all. It’s been a few years since Direct-To-Video was a real business which has largely been supplanted by VOD, but there’s no reason you can’t do at least one, if not more, MOW or direct-to-VOD films a year that focus on the more “inside baseball” elements of the franchise and work like the old NBC mystery wheel; an all-Klingon movie, Section 31, a Harry Mudd film, a retro throwback to “The Cage” (which is what Enterprise should have been) back when space was dangerous and unknown and, if there’s a Shak’ari, a final adventure for Bill Shatner as Captain Kirk. These would be the equivalent of what the fan films are doing now which are clearly filling a void for Trekkers, but would be done with first-rate production values, acting and special effects in the actual Star Trek universe. They’d be relatively inexpensive to produce and extremely lucrative for the studio as well as create new licensing revenue. And rather than detract from interest in the feature film series, they would help sustain interest in the interim.

A Wise Decision, Captain

And last but not least, to prove you value the fans, it is essential to remaster all the Trek films for the 50th anniversary with new bonus materials, including both the theatrical releases and the TV cuts of most of the films. And this is the time to spend the money to revisit the Robert Wise Director’s Edition of Star Trek: The Motion Picture in hi-def which deserves to see its Blu-Ray debut (and while you’re at it, throw some money at Star Trek V and fix those atrocious Bran Ferren visual effects and give Shatner a chance to revisit his original Rockman ending. It won’t save the film, but it’ll help). Ultimately, MGM treated Bond with respect and the Lowry 4K restorations were stunning and the packaging was elegant and respectful of an august five decade history and its significance in pop culture history. It is imperative that Star Trek be treated this way instead of as some kitschy refuge from an SNL skit which is far too often how the franchise has been dubiously treated by its studio overlords (remember The Star Trek Honors on UPN, the equivalent of the Star Wars Holiday Special for Trek). Too often the perception that dominates studio thinking is Trek fans are a bunch of freaks, the one’s that more often than not show up in the documentaries about Trek fans that grok Spock, but are only a small part of the rich tapestry of Trekkers who love the Trek universe and are fairly well-adjusted individuals (you know, the people we made Free Enterprise about).

In addition, it’s unlikely CBS will incur the costs involved in re-creating the visual effects for Deep Space Nine and Voyager the way they did for Star Trek: The Next Generation given its anemic sales (which is a shame because they were beautifully produced), but it should strongly consider take two for Deep Space Nine which was the last great Trek show made. In the case of Voyager, it’s unlikely there would be much value in either syndication or home video for this title so upconversion is a, granted, inferior option. This would allow the series, shot on film to be presented in hi-definition, with the quality of the visual effects somewhat diminished since they can’t be bumped up to true 1080p. It’s an option that was employed somewhat effectively for Farscape and would allow the studio to, at least, release the show on Blu-Ray at lesser quality than a true 1080 transfer without revisiting the visual effects which may not be financially feasible. Even if CBS chooses to upconvert both titles rather than do a costly visual effects restoration, the creation of new bonus materials on par with the superb material produced for both Enterprise and ST: TNG is a must.

Keep on Trekking….

And none of this precludes the continued success of Bad Robot’s movie franchise. Both films under the aegis of J.J. Abrams and Bryan Burk have been hugely successful and critically acclaimed (despite the damning protestations of some die-hard Trekkers) and with Roberto Orci at the helm of the next film, an avowed and passionate Trek fan himself, there’s no reason to believe the next movie will be any less successful than its two predecessors and certainly has the potential to be the best one yet. The brain trust behind these films made a very smart decision early on which was that these films exist in an alternate universe to the original movies and TV series so neither needs to preclude either from continuing to live long and prosper in tandem. Clearly, Bob Orci will have a prominent role in the new Trek order and as a fan and uber successful screenwriter and TV producer his contributions to the future of Trek are essential. While I would’ve said a few months ago that it’s time to take off the training wheels and let the new series continue without the participation of previous Trek stars, the prospect of Shatner and Nimoy re-uniting for the 50th anniversary is too thrilling a prospect to ignore and I certainly hope that they do a find a way to make it so.

And if Marvel isn’t the perfect template for you, look no further than what Disney is already doing with Star Wars. They’ve made a quick succession of extremely forward-thinking decisions about the future of the franchise. They hired the smart and creative producer Kathleen Kennedy to run Lucasfilm, quickly greenlit a series of films, hired a succession of brilliant filmmakers including J.J. Abrams, Rian Johnson and the great Lawrence Kasdan, put a charming animated series into production and hired writers to develop several spin-off films. Disney never looked down on Star Wars, they conceived a plan and implemented it while hiring filmmakers who are devoted fans of the source material. Every scrap of information I’ve seen on Episode 7 has filled me with a new hope for Star Wars after the debacle of the prequels.
Q__
Moderator
#124 - Wysłana: 12 Paź 2014 17:58:52
Odpowiedz 
Admittedly, Star Trek is a dramatically different franchise than Star Wars, but the template remains just as applicable. While at its heart Star Wars is a movie franchise, Trek is a television franchise with a motion picture component. The sense of wonder and exploration at the heart of Star Trek can only be served best in an episodic series. There’s a reason that Star Trek inspired a generation of fans to become scientists, astronomers, engineers, doctors and bricklayers. While Star Wars is elevated pulp in the best sense of the word, Star Trek is something else entirely. At its heart have always been characters who are a family who are united by friendship, loyalty and an insatiable curiosity about the unknown. In a culture in which cynicism and fatalism are the currency of the day whether it be because of political gridlock, economic depression, famine, the horror of disease, even our best television series such as Breaking Bad plumb the darkness of man. What makes Star Trek so great is that even when it goes into darkness – it still manages to come out the other side extolling the human adventure which is a palpable sense of optimism and hope for the future. It’s a progressive, liberal vision that is to be lauded and not deconstructed or replaced with the fashionable pessimism that permeates the zeitgeist of today. I don’t think optimism needs to be old school, but it needs to be earned. In the end, it’s harder to write characters that aspire and situations that inspire without being hokey and, dare I say, old-fashioned, which is why it’s so important that the creative team be chosen wisely and rise to the challenge before them. It also doesn’t mean there can’t be conflict, both inter-personal and inter-stellar, there must be both in order for Star Trek to be good drama, but humanity united has always been at the very heart of Star Trek rather than humanity divided. Star Trek at its best is space opera writ large with something to say about the human condition.

So there you go. This is what should and, quite frankly, needs to happen. Much like the plot of many a great Star Trek episode, the Eminians and the Vendikans, um, I mean Paramount and CBS need to find a way to work together harmoniously. It’s a recipe for success, honoring the past, and insuring the future longevity of a beloved and important franchise for many decades to come. May your way be as pleasant.


MARK A. ALTMAN who the Los Angeles Times once called “the world’s foremost Trekspert” is the writer/producer of the film, Free Enterprise, starring William Shatner and Eric McCormack. He has been a writer/producer on numerous television series including Castle, Necessary Roughness, Femme Fatales and is co-author of the upcoming oral history of Star Trek, The Fifty Year Mission, from St. Martin’s Press. You can follow him on Twitter at @markaaltman.

Mark will also be moderating a panel on “50 Years of Trek: From The Cage to Today” at 7 PM on Saturday, October 11th at New York Comic Con featuring Scott Mantz (Access Hollywood), Chase Masterson (Deep Space Nine), David Mack (Star Trek author), Edward Gross (The 50 Year Mission author) and Vic Mignona (Star Trek Continues).


Oryginał:
http://io9.com/how-to-turn-star-trek-into-the-next -marvel-movie-univer-1643498264
Wersja z TrekMovie:
http://trekmovie.com/2014/10/09/why-star-trek-is-p aramounts-marvel-and-they-dont-even-know-it/
(Wrzucam obie, bo ciekawe są dyskusje pod tymi tekstami.)

Co sądzicie?

(Ja chyba bym zwrócił uwagę na fakt, że Trek był już takim "Marvelem" w erze TNG/DS9/VOY/filmów-z-Łysym/ENT. I zadał sobie pytanie czy zaszkodził mu sam ten fakt, czy to jak zamysł ów przeprowadzono...
Zgadzam się natomiast w zupełności, że człowiek-z-wizją, i to sensowną, desperacko potrzebny.)
Q__
Moderator
#125 - Wysłana: 12 Sty 2015 22:16:29 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Kolejna taka kobyła:

The Future of Star Trek: It’s the Story, Stupid
January 11, 2015
by Lukas Kendall at Film Score Monthly (www.filmscoremonthly.com)

There has been a cottage industry of essays about how to make Star Trek more popular. Many of the prescriptions are simple: Put it back on television. Hire good people to make it. (Certainly, good creators always help.)

But there is a basic assumption that Star Trek could be every bit as successful as the Marvel universe or Star Wars—or even DC—if only CBS and Paramount could work through their business problems.

I think it’s not so simple—and the reason why is not a matter of taste. It is a matter of story.

Star Wars and the Marvel movies are action-packed spectacles that appeal to attention-deficit teenagers—the blockbuster sweet spot. Star Trek, by contrast, appeals to the brainy outsider. It’s slow, talky, even philosophical—a little bit like eating your vegetables.

The same things that are the source of Star Trek’s appeal are also the source of its limitations. Try to change it to appeal to everyone, and you’ll appeal to no one.

Movies

Star Trek just had two mega-budget blockbusters that were aggressively made and marketed for the modern, global movie audience. They are spectacular productions that cost a lot of money, made a lot of money, were popular and well reviewed—but did not set box-office records. A third film is likely to continue the trend.

Tellingly, some Trek fans revile the new films. That is because, in order to appeal to a modern global audience, they fundamentally alter the franchise’s DNA. This has nothing to do with the creation of an alternate timeline, which is ingenious. It is about taking a pacifist, cerebral, talky television show and turning it into an action-adventure movie. Something is lost along the way.

Star Trek is fundamentally not action-adventure. Drama is conflict, and blockbuster movies are about “branding” the conflict as specific forms of physical fighting: Comic book movies are superpower slugfests. Star Wars is lightsaber duels, blasters and spaceship dogfights. James Cameron’s films are commando-style militaristic warfare. The Matrix is “bullet-time” kung fu.

Star Trek has always had its share of fighting—from 1960s fisticuffs to submarine-style warfare—but the best Star Trek “fighting”…is talking. Kirk talks a computer into exploding. Picard talks a bad guy into laying down his arms.

Star Trek has never translated well to movies. Its style and ideas play best on television, without the need to: (1) encapsulate its entire world (2) into the fundamental transformation of a single character, (3) that happens over two hours, (4) with all of civilization in jeopardy, including (5) stuff for the supporting cast to do and (6) all the de rigueur “He’s dead, Jim” moments, while (7) humoring die hard fans by not changing too much and (8) pandering to morons.

The best Star Trek film is still The Wrath of Khan—which doesn’t put Earth in jeopardy or climax in a fistfight, kills a major character (as a requirement of being made), and was shot cheaply on recycled sets. At a time when Star Trek was only 79 episodes of the original series, a cartoon, and a widely seen but unloved movie, Nicholas Meyer and his colleagues had the freedom to do what they wanted, so long as it was cheap: tell a good, literary and character-based story. Today, that movie would not survive the first development meeting.

Television

A common refrain is to put Star Trek back on television and make it for adults—the Mad Men or Game of Thrones of Star Trek series. Sounds exciting!

It’s also impossible. You can’t make the “adult” Star Trek series because Star Trek is not about adults. It can be for adults, but it is not about them.

What are the driving realities of adult life? Sex and money. What is never in Star Trek? Sex and money.

Sure, there’s suggested sex. Off-screen sex. Characters have romantic relationships, but viewed as a child would—Mommy and Daddy go to their room, and come out the next morning.

Money? There are “credits” but I still don’t understand the Federation’s economic system. Do the crew get paid? Is the Federation communist? (There was a great article about this:https://medium.com/@RickWebb/the-economics-of-star -trek-29bab88d50)

There have already been 726 episodes and 12 movies of Star Trek—and too many of them revolve around misunderstood space anomalies.

Would it be best to start from scratch? Creatively—no doubt about it. But Star Trek fans would never allow that. Star Trek is not like James Bond or Batman, where every decade you cast a new actor and wipe the slate clean. Or like Marvel’s movies and TV series, which are drawn from fifty years of mythology, but nobody expects them to slavishly reproduce the comic books—or even be consistent with each other.

Star Trek fans demand every installment connect with every other one. We already have the “Abramsverse,” which was cleverly constructed as an alternate reality. Can there be another recasting, with a third actor playing Kirk, or a second playing Picard? I doubt it.

Stay in the Abramsverse? Possibly, but Into Darkness demonstrated the problem of doing this: you’re constantly running into characters and scenarios you already know. Not only do the writers have to tell the same story twice—for the people who know the original, and the ones who don’t—but it’s never as good the second time.

Go another hundred years into the future, aboard the Enterprise-G? Maybe. But no matter what, you have a consistent, intricate universe that has to be respected. Hard to bump into an asteroid without it being like that time on Gamma Epsilon VI.

Star Trek already had one fundamental storytelling upgrade: when The Next Generation got good in season three (circa 1990) and took a turn into Philip K. Dick issues of perception and reality—which is to say, postmodernism. It jettisoned the 1960s melodrama—great move—but replaced it with technobabble. Ugh.

The Problem With Star Trek

Unlike the Marvel universe—which takes place in contemporary reality—Star Trek takes place in the future. And not just an abstract future, but a specific vision of the future from fifty years in the past. It’s not only a period piece, but a parallel universe—a “double remove.”

Before man landed on the moon, manned space travel was plausible. Roddenberry intended the bridge of the Enterprise to be completely believable. (Next to The Beverly Hillbillies, he was doing Chekhov—that’s with an h.) But we now know that (Interstellar and Avatar aside) interplanetary space travel is not realistic, or certainly not happening any time soon.

As a result, Star Trek is irrevocably dated. What was meant to be the actual future has become a fantasy future—but it’s not allowed to acknowledge it. Star Wars is unashamed space fantasy, set in a make-believe galaxy, but Star Trek is supposed to be real. (I guess I missed the Eugenics Wars.) Ever wonder why in Star Trek they only listen to classical music, or sometimes jazz? Hearing anything recorded after 1964 would puncture the reality (except for time travel stories). This is the same reason why The West Wing never referenced a president after Kennedy.

Roddenberry aspired to do cosmic wonder and weirdness—“The Cage,” Star Trek: The Motion Picture—but these stories are wildly expensive and dramatically abstract. (How do you fight an alien that can destroy you with its thoughts?) Star Trek became a more elevated version of Flash Gordon or Buck Rodgers, a predecessor to Star Wars, transplanting 19th century colonialism (instead of feudalism) into space. Klingons instead of Russians, Romulans instead of Chinese (or vice versa). It’s a futuristic version of Captain Horatio Hornblower, as Nick Meyer realized—and Roddenberry intended—that could be practically produced on a weekly basis. (Master and Commander is a great Star Trek movie.)

Why can’t you do a variety of stories set in different corners of the Star Trek universe? Because Marvel can go anyplace in the contemporary world to mine relatable characters and interesting storylines—from the corridors of a high school to the streets of New York City to foreign countries to mythical Asgard. But Star Trek has to go different places within its own, make-believe universe, bound by specific storytelling and ideological rules: it is, by definition, a ship in space. They tried space without a ship (DS9), a ship lost in space (Voyager), a prequel ship (Enterprise), and an alternate universe ship (Abramsverse); how many more variations can there be? One wonders if even Star Wars will be able to sustain its “expanded universe” movies and TV series, but it has the advantages of a bigger fanbase, more action-adventure style, and fewer continuity restrictions.

How do you reinvent Star Trek for a modern television audience? There already was a terrific, adult human space drama—from one of the best Star Trek writers, Ron Moore. Battlestar Galactica was adapted from an old TV show that Moore was at complete liberty to rework (since it sucked and no one cared).

One thing Moore took care to do: no aliens. Because aliens fundamentally don’t make sense. All over the galaxy, there are aliens who look and act like (white) humans with bumpy foreheads, they all speak English (somehow “universally translated”), each planet has a single culture and government, yet the Prime Minister’s office consists of three people, and no society has television—really?

But we can’t get rid of aliens on Star Trek—because of Spock. Who rules.

So as much as I’d love to see Star Trek on the small screen again, I question how it could be done without violating continuity or its fundamental appeal. It’s certainly not suitable for a True Detective-style reimagining.
Q__
Moderator
#126 - Wysłana: 12 Sty 2015 22:17:19 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
The Appeal

What is the appeal of Star Trek? Forget about sex and money—the humans on Star Trek aren’t even human. The aliens are human. Let me explain.

The appeal of Star Trek—the drug that intoxicates a certain percentage of the world’s population—is Gene Roddenberry’s vision of a utopian future. We despair at the pathetic failures of our species—our polluting, warfare, cruelty and selfishness—but Star Trek says, “Relax. Humanity will survive. We will triumph. We will solve our problems and fly to the stars. Everything will be great!”

It is a wonderful, inspirational message. It deserves to have lasted fifty years—may it last forever. It’s not necessarily a future that will come to pass, but it’s good to have this positive message in the culture. (The best TV series of the last twenty years to carry this spirit? The West Wing.)

It’s not just the fantasy of us as a species. Roddenberry’s vision is one of adult life as seen by a child, anxious about a future as a grown-up. How will I live by myself, without my parents? How will I learn to socialize, to have romantic love, a family of my own, a job? Will the world still be there for me? Who will take care of me?

Starfleet will! You will have a job on the Enterprise, full of friends, colorful uniforms, understandable work (Warp speed! Level-one diagnostics!), galactic adventure, and a social life of fun on the Holodeck and poker in Riker’s quarters.

Think about the characters on Star Trek. Gene Roddenberry was adamant that humanity would evolve and shed petty and negative characteristics. Drama relies upon conflict between characters—but he didn’t want the crew to fight amongst themselves. Therefore—to the frustration of most of Star Trek’s writers—Star Trek’s human characters are bereft of the personality traits that create drama.

How does one tell a Star Trek story if drama (conflict between characters) is forbidden? The humans are drama-free—so you make the aliens the humans.

Consider Star Trek’s most pivotal characters: they are always the aliens. In Star Trek, humans are perfect—therefore dull. The aliens, however, are versions of human children learning how to become adults.

Spock is a repressed child. Data is a shy child. Worf is an angry child. Seven of Nine is a repressed, angry child with big boobs.

The same goes for the races: the Vulcans are repressed kids, the Klingons angry kids. (The Romulans have never quite worked because…what are they, exactly?)

Think of the three most-developed characters on Next Generation: Picard, Data and Worf. (Picard is the father figure, representing all of humanity.)

What did we really learn about Riker, except that he played trombone (because the actor did)? About Troi (half-alien, but close enough), except that she liked chocolate? About Crusher…at all?

And didn’t they struggle to find quality episodes for these characters?

In Star Trek, the human characters lack dimension—because they are idealized. They are viewed as perfect the way children view their parents as perfect—finding them incapable of dark or deviant behavior. At most, they are given trivial social problems to solve—like Geordi being nervous about going on a first date. (What was he, forty? The chief engineer on the best ship in the fleet, and he couldn’t get laid?)

The child-parent model explains why attempts to go “dark” on Star Trek—from Nemesis to Into Darkness, and even rebelling against the Federation in Insurrection—never work. It’s like watching Mommy and Daddy fight—it’s not interesting, it’s sickening. (The exception that proves the rule: the Mirror universe, a wacky funhouse that’s not real.)

In the last movie, watching Kirk be a brash asshole (again!) and the Federation warmongering maniacs is like seeing your dad as an alcoholic and your mom a hooker. Sure, it may make for a more interesting family, but it actually hurts to watch.

In marketing speak: it goes against the brand. (I hope someone reads this.)

The Best Star Trek

Maybe you think I hate Star Trek. Au contraire! I love it. I would love to see new Star Trek produced and be popular.

But it has to be good Star Trek, and that requires a leap of faith on the part of the producers.

For Star Trek to be high quality, it has to risk appealing to fewer people—less action, more talk. Fewer special effects, not more. Intimate, not epic.

Making a lot of it is not a good idea because it’ll start to repeat itself and suck (cf. Enterprise).

Fans are not necessarily the best people to dictate what Star Trek ought to be. They want exactly what they’ve already seen, while also being completely surprised. Can’t be done. (This is the problem with all sequels and franchises.)

Fans are also obsessed with “continuity porn”—brief moments of recognition with no storytelling value. They are empty calories.

Nick Meyer likens Star Trek to the Catholic mass, which has been set to music by composers throughout the centuries. The composers can change the music, but the text is always the same. Star Trek has a glorious text that can be set into music a few more times—at least. But the text is not well understood—certainly not by studio executives, and rarely even by fans.

There are doubtless readers of this essay who will bristle at my implications that Star Trek is for children—that by extension I am calling them children. Star Trek is not for idiot children. On the contrary, it is for very bright children—ones with big hearts and quick minds who long for purpose, a sense of belonging and a universe that is just and wise.

It is for the child in all of us, stripped of our adult baggage, forever hopeful, curious, eager to please and to experience love—not necessarily a romantic love, but the love of all of mankind. “All I want,” you may say to yourself, “is to be a good person, and be loved for it.”

Importantly, the best Star Trek stories involve death, from “The City on the Edge of Forever” and The Wrath of Khan to “The Bonding” and “Yesterday’s Enterprise.” They feature characters facing death, a little bit as a child would (the first loss of a grandparent), but accepting it with elegance and grace—an inspiration for all of us who must come to terms with our mortality.

When we accept death, we also accept life. We accept ourselves.

Or at least, I think this is what Spock was trying to tell me…on my birthday.

Live Long and Prosper

Star Trek has survived for fifty years, and will hopefully survive for fifty more. It’s a wonderful, timeless creation, with an important message about the human condition.

That message, says Linus on the school stage, is not to buy more DVDs, toys or movie tickets. When it comes to merchandising and exploitation, Star Trek may be the granddaddy of them all, but it will always to take a back seat to something flashier and more popular. As well it should.

Star Trek should not be run like a money machine, but curated like an important museum piece—which is paradoxically how it will become the most popular, and make the most money. This doesn’t mean it should never change. The “music” always needs to be updated, shorn of things that are dated and bad. But the “text” is immutable.

The next Star Trek creators need not be Star Trek fans—many of the best have known nothing of it (Nick Meyer), but also so have some of the worst (Stuart Baird)—so long as they understand and appreciate the text.

The text is the heart of Star Trek. It is story, not spectacle. It is gentle, not aggressive. It is optimistic, not dark. It is hopeful, compassionate and, above all—the captain says with a tear running down his cheek—human. In the right hands, it can, and should, last forever.

Lukas Kendall has produced collector’s edition soundtrack CDs to multiple Star Trek films and television series, along with hundreds of other albums for his label, Film Score Monthly, and others. His first film as a cowriter and producer, the indie thriller Lucky Bastard, is not for kids and not at all like Star Trek. He says some of his critical ideas about Trek and child psychology were inspired by a little-known 1990s book of essays called Enterprise Zones (http://www.amazon.com/Enterprise-Zones-Critical-Po sitions-Studies/dp/0813328985).


Znów rodem z TrekMovie:
http://trekmovie.com/2015/01/11/editorial-the-futu re-of-star-trek-its-the-story-stupid/

Zgadzam się w dużej części z tezami autora. Choć o paru b. istotnych problemach (np. o bolesnym postarzeniu się Trekowej wizji przyszłości czy fanowskim umiłowaniu owego anachronicznego kanonu) napomknął, że są, a potem prześlizgnął się nad nimi...
Q__
Moderator
#127 - Wysłana: 17 Sty 2015 00:16:35
Odpowiedz 
Q__
Moderator
#128 - Wysłana: 22 Sty 2015 21:11:33 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
I komentarz do w/w światełka (czyli kolejna kobyła, której nikt z Was nie przeczyta):

The CW or Any Other Network

Slow news month?!

Both December and January have provided their share of tepid Star Trek stories be it #bringinriker or more recently the news that the CW would love to air a new Star Trek series.

Quick background point - the CW did pick up some of the pieces when the UPN network closed in 2006. That network launched with Voyager if you recall (very relevant given the anniversary last week) and it is linked to CBS which would make even more sense since they own the TV rights to Star Trek. Anyway, this is just about as heavy a news story as the possibility that Frakes could, maybe direct Star Trek 3.

Apparently a network would like to show a new series. To quote myself from a previous post, I'm sure any network if you asked them would like to air a new Star Trek series. Heck, anyone called Nickelodeon yet? OK - the demographic would be a factor here and looking at the CW Network they do have shows such as Supernatural, The Flash, Arrow and more which certainly fit the fantasy genre which might mean Star Trek gaining a younger audience. Cue young cast.

With production under way in some form for the next movie interest will be rife. Saying this will raise interest in your network in turn and finding a home for new Star Trek show would be a sinch. It's a lot hotter property than it was in 2005 thanks to JJ Abrams but it's rebirth in the cinema rather than its original intended TV format certainly mixes things up.

However it's not finding a home that's the issue. It's the nature of the show. Times they are a (constantly) changing and just as the movies have had to adapt and even reboot, the show would need to as well to engage an audience that will be familiar with shows that changed the TV landscape since These are the Voyages narked off the fan base.

So I've been thinking, what would the show need to have that it wouldn't have had back in the day to make it a success? I reckon there are a few we need to adhere to and I'm only mentioning three that seem very relevant because it's a no-brainer that we'll need a complex, diverse crew on a starship exploring new worlds and new civilisations. Heck, if we can't get that in there we've no chance.

No One is Safe

In line with every major series going from Lost to Game of Thrones, Boardwalk Empire, The Walking Dead and more, the cast can't be a steady nine characters for the duration of the show. Hit the "realism" button and make us believe that this is real - people do die and that is something that a lot of shows do grip firmly these days. The franchise managed to kill high profile regular Spock, Yar, Dax, Kirk, Data and Tucker so it's not afraid to stick its neck out occasionally. What we're calling for is regular cast changes and updates to keep it fresh.

Reduced Seasons

A sign of the times that will mean this has to be a tight, honed, well-produced show where not a minute is wasted. There's no more time for filler episodes that we could all name in a second from Deep Space Nine in a 13 or 16 episode run. Every one has to count, has to have an impact and that weekly reset button has to be disconnected.

Could this maybe mean a slightly longer running time on each episode that in turn would mean avoiding some of those horribly rushed endings we tended to get to close it all down within 44 minutes? If you recall when The Next Generation started the episode run time was nearer 50 minutes discounting adverts and by the end of Voyager it was close to 42.

Real Issues

Not that Star Trek has ever shied away from that but now these need to be hit head on. There HAS to be an openly gay/lesbian/bisexual character; there has to be a modernisation of storytelling and style to make this modern and attractive to the cinema-goer who is only familiar with the JJ Abrams movies.

No coping out on those issues either as I kind of feel they did with Rejoined which sidestepped the issue by making it a Trill storyline. The kiss, just like the one in Plato's Stepchildren ended up just a flash in the pan sensation in a fairly average episode. Perhaps my biggest disappointment with the franchise that it has failed to make a full and proper acknowledgement of single sex relationships.

Sadly the JJ-verse is probably going to need to be the setting due to that cinematic presence so bye bye Captain Worf/Sulu et al.

And Finally...

Maybe the other consideration is who precisely is going to be responsible for bringing back Star Trek to the TV? I don't mean which network will consider it right for their demographic but who will be the Roddenberry or Berman for the 21st Century? Who could be a contender? Would Ronald D Moore think about a return to the franchise that made him? (I'm seeing a follow-up piece here).

Maybe that conversation is for another day. Right now, today though the interest in bringing back Star Trek to its natural format on the small screen is increasing and next year will only magnify that interest 100 times over. Could 2016 be the year that we get that new show or at least get the announcement of a new show? Only today I discovered that The X-Files could be getting a restart with the original Mulder and Scully partnership and if that's possible then anything can happen in this crazy madcap world.

Our thoughts here are just a starter born from a slow news story - but what would make this new show DIFFERENT? What would we get in today's environment that we would not have seen in 80's or 90's Star Trek?

http://trekclivos79.blogspot.co.uk/2015/01/the-cw- or-any-other-network.html
Q__
Moderator
#129 - Wysłana: 22 Mar 2015 16:58:38
Odpowiedz 
Pisałem ponad rok temu:
Q__:
Strona TrekWeb, zdaniem ostatniego news editora tejże, który właśnie oficjalnie złożył swoje obowiązki (kończąc je na zlinkowaniu trailera pilota ST:R) jest martwa.

Cóż, rozkład najwyraźniej postępuje - od paru dni nie jestem w stanie wejść na tę stronę. Wygląda mi to na koniec TrekWeb.

Znikła też z Sieci strona Hidden Frontier, wraz ze wszystkimi odcinkami do pobrania, encyklopedią, itd. Na zachodnich forach krążą plotki, że może nigdy nie wrócić, ale jest wciąż nadzieja, bo - jak wiemy - na ich kanale na YT przybywa remasterowanych wersji starych odcinków. Może to być, po prostu, dłuższa przerwa techniczna.

Smutne to jednak wszystko... Przemija postać tego świata... Cóż, pozostaje nam Wayback Machine.
pirogronian
Użytkownik
#130 - Wysłana: 22 Mar 2015 17:40:59 - Edytowany przez: pirogronian
Odpowiedz 
Q__:
Przemija postać tego świata...

1 Kor. 7: 31

Sentymentalizm zawsze szedł w parze z uduchowieniem...
Q__
Moderator
#131 - Wysłana: 25 Mar 2015 11:59:27 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
pirogronian

pirogronian:
1 Kor. 7: 31

Wiem.

ps. Tymczasem kolejny pomysł na reanimację Treka:
http://www.vox.com/2015/3/4/8143465/star-trek-true -detective

Pomysł o tyle na czasie, że odcinki True Detective reżyseruje Justin Lin:
http://screenrant.com/true-detective-season-2-dire ctor-casting-justin-lin-rachel-mcadams/

I rozważania o możliwości nowej serii na rocznicę:
http://www.tvwise.co.uk/2015/03/star-trek-return-t elevision-time-franchises-50th-anniversary/
Q__
Moderator
#132 - Wysłana: 12 Kwi 2015 12:39:35
Odpowiedz 
Jeszcze na marginesie filmów z Abramsverse (z nadciągającym włącznie) oraz Axanaru, Renegades i Horizona (jako prawdopodobnych balonów próbnych CBSu)...

Faktem jest, iż w Treku był zawsze element akcyjny (nawet Picard tłukł się z Klingonami w ciemnych zaułkach Qo'noS), ale nigdy - nawet w wojennych sezonach DS9 - Trek nigdy nie był mu tak bez reszty podporządkowany (w samym środku Dominion War dostaliśmy filozoficzno-społeczny epizod "Far Beyond the Stars", w akcyjniaku TWoK istotną rolę odgrywał wątek technologii Genesis - sięgania ludzi po "boskie" możliwości). Ba, sensacyjne dzianie się traktowane było jawnie po macoszemu - jedna z bójek Kirka (ta z Gornem, jak wiemy) została uznana za najgorszą scenę tego typu ever, a walki z DS9 skrytykował niedawno jako chaotyczne i niedopracowane sam Peters (mówiąc, że musiał na potrzeby Axanaru opracowywać Trekowe techniki militarne prawie od zera, bo nie miał na czym bazować) - istotniejsze było to, co myśleli i przeżywali bohaterowie (nawet gdy były to myśli i przeżycia związane z wojną).

Tymczasem nowe trailery wyglądają może i zachęcająco (Renegades najmniej, przez te mundurzyska czy wręcz mundurzydła - myślalem, że nic nie przebije w tym względzie nędzy AND, a proszę...), ale akcentują element różnopostaciowej naparzanki, nie eksploracji, choćby nawet eksploracji tego, co dzieje się w psychice bohaterów jak w najlepszych epizodach DS9... (Choć gdy słyszałem przemawiającego Ramireza, czy kapitan Singh recytującą poemat "Invictus" Henley'a, miałem wrażenie, że coś z dawnego ST gdzieś tam się tli...*)

* podobne wrażenie miałem, skądinąd, słuchając paru linijek ze wszystkich tych reklamówek "dwunastki", ale okazało się, że starczyło tego dobrego w sam raz do trailerów...

Chciałbym, po prostu, żeby choć jeden z tych projektów osadzony był na pokładzie majestatycznego explorera pełnego wyidealizowanych nerdów (ew. mrok mógłby z nich wyjść dopiero w praniu) .

Oczywiście: obejrzę przecież to wszystko i tak... i chętnie się miło rozczaruję...
pitrock
Użytkownik
#133 - Wysłana: 13 Kwi 2015 13:16:25
Odpowiedz 
jeśli chodzi o nowy film i ową Panią mającą grać „główną rolę kobiecą”, to mogę założyć się i piwko, że będzie ona kolejnym czarnym charakterem, ale to tylko takie moje gdybanie...
ST Renegades - tu niestety pomarudzę, bo bliżej mu do star wars rebelianci niż do star treka jakiego znamy i bardzo szanujemy, ale kto wie, może moje sarkanie jest nieuzasadnione.... widać ze w świecie star treka coś się dzieje, powstają produkcje ocierające się o wszystkie znane nam epoki ST, nie jest to może klasyczny serial do jakich przyzwyczailiśmy się podczas ubiegłych dekad, no ale na bezrybiu... a tak na marginesie – bardzo bym chciał, a wierzę że nie tylko ja, aby twórcy w końcu podjęliby się rozwinięcia tematu Tholian, Gorn czy innych mniej znanych ras, przecież w tym tkwi bardzo duży potencjał
Q__
Moderator
#134 - Wysłana: 13 Kwi 2015 20:29:11 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
pitrock

pitrock:
jeśli chodzi o nowy film i ową Panią mającą grać „główną rolę kobiecą”, to mogę założyć się i piwko, że będzie ona kolejnym czarnym charakterem, ale to tylko takie moje gdybanie...

Zetknąłem się już dziś z opinią, że owa dama, która na main site od wczoraj pokutuje:
http://www.startrek.pl/article.php?sid=1403
idealna byłaby do roli reBootowanej Romulan Commander. Cóż, pożyjemy - zobaczymy...

pitrock:
ST Renegades - tu niestety pomarudzę, bo bliżej mu do star wars rebelianci niż do star treka jakiego znamy i bardzo szanujemy

Faktycznie i mnie tam jedno podobieństwo do SW uderzyło. Otóż kapitan Alvarez (niezły zresztą aktor i cieszę się widząc go w Treku) nie mówi do Lexxy, a właściwie prawie szczeka (jak się słucha tego tonu), z jadem i ironią, jakich u Trekowych kapitanów nigdy nie słyszałem (nawet u Sisko, ktory z nich wszystkich chyba się najbardziej irytował). Owszem, zdarzały się w Treku sytuacje jawnie okazywanej pogardy (a to Kirk nazwał Klingonów zwierzętami, a to Picard reagował pogardliwym niesmakiem na bliższych nam czasowo hibernatusów w "The Neutral Zone"), ale takiego jadu i poczucia wyższości w ST dotąd nie widziałem, nawet Kira tak do Cardassian nie mówiła... Za to skojarzył mi się zaraz starwarsowy admirał Piett i jego sławny tekst o łowcach nagród:

No, zobaczymy jak Russ i Conway z tego wybrną w praktyce... Czy wrażenie zgrzytu pozostanie...

pitrock:
bardzo bym chciał, a wierzę że nie tylko ja, aby twórcy w końcu podjęliby się rozwinięcia tematu Tholian, Gorn czy innych mniej znanych ras, przecież w tym tkwi bardzo duży potencjał

No, niby w ENTku pod koniec po nich sięgnęli, ale robiąc z nich tylko (smakowity) ozdobnik.
Twórcy fanprodukcji też o nich pamiętali, ale ograniczyli się do zrobienia z nich prostych antagonistów. W Exeterze byl odcinek "The Tressaurian Intersection", gdzie dostaliśmy na raz Tholian i tytułowych Tressaurian*, kuzynów Gornów.
A znów w HF Tholianie byli eksploatowani dość często, ale tylko jako nowy przeciwnik w kolejnej wielkiej wojnie.
Można też wymienić parę występów Tholian (jak zwykle w roli antagonistów) w autoryzowanych wydawnictwach ST:
http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/The_Sundered
http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/The_Fallen_(comi c)
http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/Fracture
Gorn do wydawnictw mieli więcej szczęścia - odegrali sporą rolę w takiej oto powieści:
http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/Seize_the_Fire
No i dostali komiks poświęcony ich wewnętrznej polityce:
http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/The_Gorn_Crisis

* http://stexpanded.wikia.com/wiki/Tressaurian
Q__
Moderator
#135 - Wysłana: 30 Kwi 2015 22:30:46
Odpowiedz 
Czas zamykać forum?
http://blogs.leaderpost.com/2015/04/27/frakes-help s-fan-expo-boldly-enter-its-second-year/
http://www.trektoday.com/content/2015/04/frakes-fo rget-about-trek-on-tv/
http://startrekmine.blogspot.com/2015/04/jonathan- frakes-nowego-serialu-star.html
Jonathan Frakes twierdzi, że CBS nie planuje jubileuszowego serialu ST, bo - po klapie NEM - nie wierzy by tenże dawał zyski i, że jego władze są w sumie zadowolone z filmowej serii Paramountu.

ps. Moim zdaniem pozostaje mieć nadzieję, ze filmy z Abramsverse też - w końcu - skończą się klapą. Wtedy może ktoś mający przytomny pomysł na ST odkupi prawa do niego od wytwórni traktujących najwyraźniej Treka jako ciężar....
Q__
Moderator
#136 - Wysłana: 22 Maj 2015 17:15:30 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Podcast Axanaru z Davidem Gerroldem w roli gościa. Temat (główny)? Czy Trek ma przyszłość:
http://www.startrekaxanar.com/axanar-podcast-25-da vid-gerrold/
Q__
Moderator
#137 - Wysłana: 29 Maj 2015 20:45:11
Odpowiedz 
Q__
Moderator
#138 - Wysłana: 31 Maj 2015 17:55:58 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Fani organizują akcję, chcąc wymusić na CBSie powstanie przygód kapitana Worfa:
https://www.sweetesbakeshop.com/wewantworf/
Prawdę mówiąc nie sądzę, żeby to coś dało...*

* tym bardziej, że sporo fanów wolałoby spin off o Dacie lub Rikerze:
http://www.startrek.com/article/poll-says-tng-char acter-you-want-in-a-spinoff-show-is

ps. A to jest chyba wymowny symbol tego jakie miejsce dla Treka widzi Paramount (więc i nie dziwię się, że powstają plotki/obawy, jakie powstają):

http://finditcheapest.com/dvdprices.php?id=mfno110 7546
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Transformers-Star-Trek-G-I -DVD/dp/B004Q8GY7A
Q__
Moderator
#139 - Wysłana: 2 Cze 2015 00:45:44 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Chciałem sobie powtórzyć "The White Iris" na YouTube, a tu wywaliło mi:

"Star Trek Continues ..." Ten film jest już niedostępny z powodu roszczenia dotyczącego praw autorskich zgłoszonego przez użytkownika CBS.

Co prawda z tego, co wyczytałem na TrekBBS prawdopodobnie chodzi o wykorzystanie ujęcia z "The Paradise Syndrome"i wmontowanie weń Mignogny z Tiffany Brouwer, ale uważam, że CBS po raz kolejny popisuje się wyjątkową małodusznością (jednocześnie zadając kłam wersji jakoby STC było ich piątą kolumną w świecie fanprodukcji).

Ekipa STC jednak ma chyba nadzieję, że załatwi sprawę polubownie:
https://www.facebook.com/StarTrekContinues/photos/ a.368013926565463.92376.333296680037188/9821929384 80889/

Proponuję więc oglądać w/w epizod na Vimeo, bo a nuż stamtąd zniknie...

ps. Chyba jedyna nadzieja w tym, że w końcu jakiś Branson czy inny miliarder-wizjoner-Treker wykupi prawa do ST ze śliskich łapek CBSu i Paramountu i zajmie się nim z sensem, traktując Treka jako cenne dziedzictwo kultury, nie markę...
pirogronian
Użytkownik
#140 - Wysłana: 2 Cze 2015 08:49:03
Odpowiedz 
Q__:
Chciałem sobie powtórzyć "The White Iris" na YouTube, a tu wywaliło mi:

"Star Trek Continues ..." Ten film jest już niedostępny z powodu roszczenia dotyczącego praw autorskich zgłoszonego przez użytkownika CBS.

Q__:
Proponuję więc oglądać w/w epizod na Vimeo, bo a nuż stamtąd zniknie...

He, całe szczęście, że od razu zassałem na dysk. Taki zwyczaj, w dzisiejszej dobie terroru praw autorskich się opłaca
Q__
Moderator
#141 - Wysłana: 13 Cze 2015 08:36:57 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Rozważania dot. dekady bez Treka w TV:
https://www.yahoo.com/tv/a-decade-without-trek-par t-1-these-were-the-118795820890.html
https://www.yahoo.com/tv/a-decade-without-trek-par t-2-boldly-going-into-118951416590.html
Wypowiadają się twórcy od lat związani z Trekiem, w tym B&B. W sumie wyłania się z tego opowieść o erze TNG-ENT i ludziach, którzy ją kształtowali.

ps. Więcej o wspomnianej tam Strong, autorce (współ)odpowiedzialnej za całkiem niezłe epizody VOY i ENT ("Author, Author", "Damage" i nie tylko...):
http://en.memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Phyllis_Stro ng
Q__
Moderator
#142 - Wysłana: 21 Cze 2015 18:27:51
Odpowiedz 
Kolejne
Q__:
Rozważania dot. dekady bez Treka w TV:

http://1701news.com/node/816/10-years-and-still-no -trek-tv.html
Q__
Moderator
#143 - Wysłana: 14 Wrz 2015 19:55:32 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Z dyskusji pod tekstem o REN na SKoST:

Clive Burrell (Some Kind of Star Trek) It does seem like a large consensus from fans is that this has been a massive miss, far bigger than was expected I think. Axanar is still an interesting proposition but it seems to be bleeding cast and crew AND is taking an age to get made which concerns me - will people care/still give a lot of cash in another 12 months to two years when it MIGHT get there? Continues is still the top crop with Phase II close behind. I'm dabbling into other bits but I have to say there is definitely a big quality jump up to STC...

Jak widać, nie tylko Trek oficjalny, ale i Trek fanowski znalazł się w jakimś kryzysie, tym bardziej, że - jak głoszą fandomowe plotki - producenci najbardziej cenionych dziś tytułów - Vic Mignogna i Alec Peters spotkać się mają w sądzie.

Niechęć między oboma panami wiedzie się zresztą jeszcze od czasu konfliktu NV/STC, a kulminację osiągnęła chyba w czasie prób budowania (z inicjatywy Petersa) Star Trek Film Makers Association:
http://www.trekbbs.com/showthread.php?t=191479

Mało tego - pojawiły się w Sieci dyskusje nt. budżetu Axanaru (na tyle gwałtowne, że skończyło się to zamknięciem topicu o nim na TrekBBS):
http://www.trekbbs.com/showthread.php?t=189130&pag e=168
Często idące w kierunku sugestii/insynuacji, że Petersowi chodzi o własny sukces finansowy (lub wręcz, że chce malwersować pieniądze przeznaczone na film, albo nawet już to robi)
http://haxbee.com/2012/08/29/good-riddance/
https://www.reddit.com/r/startrek/comments/3f0u48/ axanar_and_alec_peters_on_a_rampage/
http://www.news9.com/story/27750391/red-dirt-diari es-star-trek-set-in-oklahoma
http://trekmovie.com/2014/10/31/these-are-the-voya ges-announces-kickstarter-campaign/

Większość tych pogłosek zdaje się pochodzić od Dana Hillenbranda (który bywa posądzany o spamowanie w Sieci anonimowymi antypetersowskimi enucjacjami), również kolekcjonera Trekowych pamiątek, którego nienawiść do Petersa ciągnie się latami:
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/p/giving-mone y-to-bankrupt-star-trek.html
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.h tml
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/p/off-topic-t reatise-my-experience-with_4.html
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/p/you-are-luc ky-you-arent-dead-friendly.html
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-m yth-of-propworx.html
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/2013/12/bring ing-and-pea-shooter-to-gunfight-or.html
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/2014/03/givin g-money-to-bankrupt-axanar-creator.html
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/2014/07/axana r-star-alec-peters-threatens-to.html
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/2014/07/the-r oad-to-hell-is-paved-with-rants.html
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/2015/01/bankr upt-propworx-returns-from-dead.html
http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/2015/05/the-p ropworx-work-ethic-or-lack-thereof.html

Sam Hillenbrand jest postacią budzącą ostre kontrowersje:
http://www.startrekpropauthority.com/2014/01/the-w rath-of-angry-dishonorable-bully.html
http://startrekauction.blogspot.com/2013/12/tos-tu nics-at-profiles-authenticity-and.html
http://startrekauction.blogspot.com/2014/07/kevin- hanson-fraud-continues.html

Acz i on miewa swoich fandomowych przyjaciół i swój (pozytywny) wkład z Trekowy świaiek:
http://borg.com/2012/06/24/trek-fan-beams-aboard-s tar-trek-galileo-shuttlecraft-from-original-series /
http://1701news.com/node/255/did-star-trek-inspire -word-shuttle-sorry-no.html

Ogólnie jednak strasznym bagnem (gorszym niż spory rodzimego fandomu) to wszystko pachnie...

Swoje kłopoty zdaje się też mieć NV/P2, wygląda na to, że pogłębiają się tam nieporozumienia w zespole, choć Cawley (dość nerwowo) rzecz dementuje:
https://www.facebook.com/james.cawley.526/posts/10 204725125757933
http://www.trekbbs.com/showthread.php?t=275782
http://www.trekbbs.com/showpost.php?p=11256062&pos tcount=19

Jak to ktoś napisał:

BillJ: This is tedious.
People that hate the Abrams films can't even get along among themselves!


By jednak nie kończyć tak smutno... Twórcom Axanaru udaje się jednak (co widać po artykułach z cyklu Fan Film Friday) jednoczyć wokół siebie twórców wielu innych produkcji, także tych, którym nie zawsze dotąd było ze sobą po drodze. Twórcom NV udała się Trekonderoga (chwalił ją nawet w/w Hillenbrand). A STC bryluje w mediach*
http://www.wsj.com/articles/when-the-audience-make s-the-cameras-roll-1441657364

* co, by całkiem różowo nie zakończyć ponoć wywołało gniew/smutek Cawley'a...

Czyli - mimo wszystko - toczy się ten Trekowy wózek do przodu jednak...
Q__
Moderator
#144 - Wysłana: 16 Gru 2015 07:47:53 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
Wiecie co? Zrobiłem sobie maraton trailerów, obejrzałem zapowiedzi wszystkich nadciągających blockbusterów jeden po drugim - SW EP VII, Warcraft, ID4 2, CA: CW, BvS, X-Men: Apocalypse, Deadpool, Suicide Squad, TMNT 2, nawet Avengers: IW, co to nie wiadomo czy autentyczny*, i nasz Beyond, doprawiłem serialową Jessicą Jones... I... przykro mi... właśnie w zapowiedzi ST XIII najmniej jest ducha macierzystej franczyzy, ducha oryginału, i najgorzej, najbiedniej, najbardziej kiczowato, to wszystko wygląda...

Nie wiem dlaczego trailery Axanaru i REN (ten drugi był zresztą znacznie lepszy niż sam pilot, zawierał najlepsze sceny zeń) potrafią być Trekem, dlaczego wszystkie pozostałe hollywoodzkie marki potrafią być sobą (i to do tego stopnia, że czuć łączność z poprzednimi częściami i pozaekranowym oryginałem, tam gdzie jest), a Beyond Trekiem być nie umie...**

* http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jr0X5ijU8Y0

** Już w zapowiedziach "dwunastki" czuło się znacznie więcej ST...

Jeszcze a'propos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmEDkl7iW2k

Tak, przeszedłem chyba na pozycje antyrebootowego betonu i nawet do Bragi tęsknię (w końcu Cosmos całkiem smakowity).

Ale, spokojnie, będę zamieszczał informacje o nowym filmie i wyłuskiwał plusy/smaczki zeń...
pitrock
Użytkownik
#145 - Wysłana: 16 Gru 2015 07:55:10
Odpowiedz 
Q__:
Nie wiem dlaczego trailery Axanaru i REN (ten drugi był zresztą znacznie lepszy niż sam pilot, zawierał najlepsze sceny zeń) potrafią być Trekem, dlaczego wszystkie pozostałe hollywoodzkie marki potrafią być sobą (i to do tego stopnia, że czuć łączność z poprzednimi częściami i pozaekranowym oryginałem, tam gdzie jest), a Beyond Trekiem być nie umie...

Zauważyłem, że różne serwisy traktujące o filmie i SF jadą po trailerze równo.
Q__
Moderator
#146 - Wysłana: 16 Gru 2015 08:01:17 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
pitrock

pitrock:
jadą po trailerze równo.

Dla mnie ten motocykl rzecz popsuł. I muzyczka. I sama ujawniona fabuła - więcej się ganiają niż w Avengers... Mniej gadają niż Gacek z Supkiem...
Ty nie masz o nim tak negatywnego zdania?
pitrock
Użytkownik
#147 - Wysłana: 16 Gru 2015 08:12:26
Odpowiedz 
Q__:
Dla mnie ten motocykl rzecz popsuł. I muzyczka. I sama fabuła - więcej się ganiają niż w Avengers... Mniej gadają niż Gacek z Supkiem...
Ty nie masz o nim tak negatywnego zdania?

Jeśli mam być szczery też mi się nie podoba z kilku powodów: po pierwsze muza w tle - lubię beastie boys, ale tu nie pasują; po drugie - zdradzają za dużo (rozwałka Entka - pytam po co? nie lepiej obserwować opad szczęki w kinie); po trzecie - no właśnie, wyśmiewany przez większość motocykl; po czwarte - umówmy się, że skoro jest jakaś zaawansowana grupa wrogo nastawionych osobników, która w jednym ataku rozdziera Ent na kawałki to dlaczego potem ich planeta jest uboga niczym wzięta z mad maxa, po piąte - to akcyjniak do bólu. Więcej grzechów nie pamiętam

Q__:
Wiecie co? zrobiłem sobie maraton trailerów, obejrzałem zapowiedzi wszystkich nadciągających blockbusterów jeden po drugim - SW EP VII, Warcraft, ID4 2, CA: CW, BvS, X-Men: Apocalypse, Deadpool, Suicide Squad, TMNT 2, nawet Avengers: IW, co to nie wiadomo czy autentyczny*, i nasz Beyond, doprawiłem serialową Jessicą Jones... I... przykro mi... właśnie w zapowiedzi ST XIII najmniej jest ducha macierzystej franczyzy, ducha oryginału, i najgorzej, najbiedniej, najbardziej kiczowato, to wszystko wygląda...

W przypadku ST Beyond odniosłem wrażenie, że chyba zabrakło im pomysłu jak trailer sprawnie złożyć. Może inaczej – owszem pomysł mieli, ale zapomnieli o duchu kosmicznej wędrówki i rzutem na taśmę zrobili zeń akcyjną popisówkę, zamiast dramatycznej otoczki na którą w mojej opinii zasługuje (Ent w zgliszczach a wesoła załoga świaetnie się bawi ujeżdżając motocykl).
Osobiście bardzo wyczekuję Warcrafta, kiedyś spotkałem się z opinią że pobije władce pierścieni i hobbita - no cóż, obejrzę to się wypowiem
Q__
Moderator
#148 - Wysłana: 16 Gru 2015 08:26:05 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
pitrock

pitrock:
W przypadku ST Beyond odniosłem wrażenie, że chyba zabrakło im pomysłu jak trailer sprawnie złożyć. Może inaczej – owszem pomysł mieli, ale zapomnieli o duchu kosmicznej wędrówki i rzutem na taśmę zrobili zeń akcyjną popisówkę, zamiast dramatycznej otoczki na którą w mojej opinii zasługuje (Ent w zgliszczach a wesoła załoga świaetnie się bawi ujeżdżając motocykl).

Zastanawiam się czy nie zadziałał jeszcze jeden czynnik... Cała w/w superbohaterszczyzna i ID4 mają za scenerię nasz świat, przerysowany, przyprawiony komiksowym kiczem i przegiętymi efektami, ale jakoś tam realny, bo odwołujący się do realnych strojów, wnętrz, a nade wszystko realnych - nawet gdy przetworzonych - problemów. To odniesienie do świata za oknem automatycznie dodaje powagi...
Fantasy z kolei to charakterystyczny baśniowo-mityczno-legendarny szlif, to piękno przyrody, to uroda fantastycznych budowli, to - wmontowana w konwencję - przesadzona nawet - podniosłość... Znów: powaga.
Tymczasem Trek zawsze niósł w sobie elementy kiczu (sweterki, w sumie dość żałośni "Obcy", bójki), ale równoważył to (często z naddatkiem) - filozofią, technologicznym profetyzmem, lepszą czy gorszą naukowością, wreszcie koturnową powagą, czasem nawet bolesną i sięgającą granic mimowolnej śmieszności (b. mi się podobało zdanie z FB REN, że klasyczny Trek miał w sobie coś operowego), ogólnie poczuciem, że mowa jest o ważnych sprawach. Teraz kiedy to wszystko zabrano (parę fajnych nowych klas jednostek GF w "jedenastce" to za mało) został tylko nagi kicz, a kiedy dodano doń jeszcze komiksową akcję - nie zrównoważoną, jak w superbohaterszczyznach i fantasy, dodającym sieriozności tłem - wyszło jak wyszło...

pitrock:
Osobiście bardzo wyczekuję Warcrafta, kiedyś spotkałem się z opinią że pobije władce pierścieni i hobbita

Cóż, jest to możliwe - podobny budżet, podobna uroda kadrów, a dalece mniej czarno-biały konflikt... no i dobrze się kojarzący reżyser. Tak, widzę na to szansę...

Ale i ja:
pitrock:
obejrzę to się wypowiem

pitrock
Użytkownik
#149 - Wysłana: 16 Gru 2015 08:55:08 - Edytowany przez: pitrock
Odpowiedz 
Q__:
Zastanawiam się czy nie zadziałał jeszcze jeden czynnik... Cała w/w superbohaterszczyzna i ID4 mają za scenerię nasz świat, przerysowany, przyprawiony komiksowym kiczem i przegiętymi efektami, ale jakoś tam realny, bo odwołujący się do realnych strojów, wnętrz, a nade wszystko realnych - nawet gdy przetworzonych - problemów. To odniesienie do świata za oknem automatycznie dodaje powagi...

Q__:
Tymczasem Trek zawsze niósł w sobie elementy kiczu (sweterki, w sumie dość żałośni "Obcy", bójki), ale równoważył to (często z naddatkiem) - filozofią, technologicznym profetyzmem, lepszą czy gorszą naukowością, wreszcie koturnową powagą, czasem nawet bolesną i sięgającą granic mimowolnej śmieszności (b. mi się podobało zdanie z FB REN, że klasyczny Trek miał w sobie coś operowego), ogólnie poczuciem, że mowa jest o ważnych sprawach. Teraz kiedy to wszystko zabrano (parę fajnych nowych klas jednostek GF w "jedenastce" to za mało) został tylko nagi kicz, a kiedy dodano doń jeszcze komiksową akcję - nie zrównoważoną, jak w superbohaterszczyznach i fantasy, dodającym sieriozności tłem - wyszło jak wyszło...

Trek w moim odczuciu zawsze dążył do swego rodzaju autentyczności. Starano się by to co w serialu zostało pokazane miało odniesienie do naszej rzeczywistości, a to co fantastyczne było logiczne i uzasadnione. Stąd tak często krytykowany technobełkot, którego nie ma w najbliższych tematyce SW. No ale teraz Trek zdaje się zbliżać właśnie do SW tylko, że z opłakanym skutkiem. SW było swoistą fantasy w świecie SF. Natomiast ST staje się... no właśnie czym? SF z elementami komedii? SF z przewagą akcji? Czy może filmem z elementami fantastyczno naukowymi. Myślę, że to jest problem obecnego Treka – ma kryzys tożsamości.

Q__:
Cóż, jest to możliwe - podobny budżet, podobna uroda kadrów, a dalece mniej czarno-biały konflikt... no i dobrze się kojarzący reżyser. Tak, widzę na to szansę...

Wracając do Warcrafta muszę od razu podzielić się swoimi obawami. Tak jak pisałem ktoś się wypowiedział, że Warcraft pobije Hobbita i Władcę Pierścieni. Szczęścia życzę bo poprzeczka postawiona jest bardzo wysoko. Owszem obie produkcje miały swoje wady – jakie każdy wie, ale należy pamiętać, że zostały nakręcone na motywach epokowych powieści. Twórcy mieli idealne fundamenty pod równie epokowe filmy. Tolkien dał nam czytelnikom spójny świat, spójną treść i wspaniałą opowieść. Blizzard z kolei ma na swoim koncie rewelacyjne gry – twierdzę nawet, że podobnie jak H i WP były one epokowe dla graczy. Pytanie tylko czy stanowią one dobry materiał na równie dobry film? Tak, pod warunkiem że fabuła przyszłego filmu dorówna doznaniom z gry. Jak wiadomo przenoszenie gier na ekran odbywało się z różnym skutkiem. Warcraftowi dopinguję bardzo, bo podoba mi się przedstawiony tam świat, bohaterowie i towarzyszące im opowieści. Ale tak jak napisałem, poprzeczka jest wysoka i bardzo bym chciał by Warcraft przynajmniej dorównał H i WP.
Q__
Moderator
#150 - Wysłana: 16 Gru 2015 09:24:53 - Edytowany przez: Q__
Odpowiedz 
pitrock

pitrock:
Trek w moim odczuciu zawsze dążył do swego rodzaju autentyczności. Starano się by to co w serialu zostało pokazane miało odniesienie do naszej rzeczywistości, a to co fantastyczne było logiczne i uzasadnione. Stąd tak często krytykowany technobełkot

Owszem. Mimo kiczu o którym wspomniałem Trek traktował się b. serio - stąd pierwsi w historii konsultanci naukowi, stąd sążniste, precyzyjne, Manuale zaczynające jako biblie scenarzystów. Kicz - przynajmniej w erze Roddenberry'ego - był raczej produktem niedoskonałości, technicznych niemożności, budżetu, błędów niedouczonych scenarzystów niż świadomym wyborem. Celową (lub wynikającą z twórczej inercji i/lub odgórnych/fandomowych nacisków) stylizacją zaczął się stawać - bo ja wiem? - chyba na etapie VOY dopiero (i w filmach Bennetta trochę). Z sensem poszczególnych odcinków bywało różnie, ale świat jako całość miał (lub chociaż symulował) sens.
Mało tego: z TMP widać, że G.R. był zdecydowany ów kicz dokumentnie usunąć i - zanim został odsunięty - zaszedł w tym dość daleko...

Widać natomiast, że zarówno władzom Paramountu, części fandomu, jak i niektórym twórcom (REN to obnaża) było z owym kiczem po drodze i dlatego nigdy z ST nie zniknął... Szkoda zresztą, bo - choć nie podzielam zachwytów nad "Interstellarem", a i "Avatar" zdarzało mi się krytykować - wolałbym, by Trek szedł gdzieś w kierunku tych filmów, a nie nurzał się w tym, co w nim było najgorsze i - w sumie - wymuszone czynnikami zewnętrznymi...

pitrock:
teraz Trek zdaje się zbliżać właśnie do SW tylko, że z opłakanym skutkiem. SW było swoistą fantasy w świecie SF.

Tak, tylko, że SW traktowało się serio - te Wielkie Dramaty, to nawiązanie do skondensowanych autentycznych tradycji filozoficzno-religijnych, ta struktura monomitu, ten - na swój baśniowy sposób - "realistyczny" świat used future będący b. charakterystyczną propozycją estetyczną...
Trek - już od czasu gdy Braga zaczął bawić się VOY - siebie serio nie traktuje...*

* A jest to wielki błąd... Popatrzmy - skoro o superbohaterach wspominałem - na sukces takiego Super Power Beat Down - przecież bierze się tam pochodzące z komiksów, gier i rozrywkowych filmów nierealne postacie dysponujące niemożliwymi mocami, i wystrojone we wdzianka stanowiące modowy koszmar, a następnie wtłacza je w formułę niekanonicznego, a więc niezobowiązującego z definicji, versusa - czyli, powiedzmy to wprost, krwawego mordobicia - którego wynik przesądzany jest w dodatku przez głosowanie, nie jakąkolwiek rozumową analizę, obudowanego w dodatku żartami i fanwankiem... Przecież to idealna okazja do kpienia z tego co się robi, do puszczania oka (że, wicie, my tu bzdurę kręcimy), naśmiewania się z bohaterów, tematu i widzów... A jednak jest na odwrót - Schoenke okazuje wielki szacunek widowni, a - niepoważnych z definicji - bohaterów traktuje z powagą. Nie pozwala też sobie na szczególne techniczne wpadki, cyzeluje każdy szczegół. Oraz b. dba o wierność oryginałowi. I samo to wystarcza by stworzyć popkulturowe arcydziełka, bo Treści, głębi przecież tam brak...

pitrock:
Myślę, że to jest problem obecnego Treka – ma kryzys tożsamości.

Owszem. I prawdę mówiąc widać to nie tylko w nowych filmach. Było to już zauważalne w GEN (co to miało być wielkim świętem), w NEM, w późnym DS9, w VOY i ENT. Widać to także w fanprodukcjach, które w najlepszym wypadku proponują powrót do sprawdzonej formuły TOS. Trek nie robi tego co robił kiedyś - nie idzie do przodu pozostając jednocześnie sobą. Raczej obraca się, w najlepszym wypadku - w swój własny cień, w najgorszym - w nędzną autoparodię.

I nawet Uncharted nie umiało tego zmienić - wiele założeń było bardzo dobrych, ale fabuła pilota mdła i generyczna, odfajkowująca różne Trekowe standardy, niekoniecznie te najlepsze...

Tak właściwie nowe filmy nie są forsownym psuciem idealnie się mającego dotąd ST (jak chcą niektórzy), są jednym z wielu przejawów totalnego pogubienia się obecnego Treka...

pitrock:
ktoś się wypowiedział, że Warcraft pobije Hobbita i Władcę Pierścieni. Szczęścia życzę bo poprzeczka postawiona jest bardzo wysoko. Owszem obie produkcje miały swoje wady – jakie każdy wie, ale należy pamiętać, że zostały nakręcone na motywach epokowych powieści. Twórcy mieli idealne fundamenty pod równie epokowe filmy. Tolkien dał nam czytelnikom spójny świat, spójną treść i wspaniałą opowieść. Blizzard z kolei ma na swoim koncie rewelacyjne gry – twierdzę nawet, że podobnie jak H i WP były one epokowe dla graczy. Pytanie tylko czy stanowią one dobry materiał na równie dobry film? Tak, pod warunkiem że fabuła przyszłego filmu dorówna doznaniom z gry.

Moim zdaniem, owszem, umiejętnie stworzona warstwa wizualna filmowego Warcrafta może emulować doświadczenia z gry, dawać wrażenie zanurzenia, uczestnictwa (i jest b. ważne by tak było...), ale... potrzeba czegoś więcej... By ścigać się z Tolkienem trzeba mieć scenariusz, który Tolkiena przebije, czyli zdoła połączyć tę samą mityczność, że tak powiem, wielkoskalowość, z nowoczesnym zniuansowaniem, z mniej czarno-białym przesłaniem, tak jednak by nie uronić struktury mitu... Jest pytaniem czy Metzen* - owszem, legenda Blizzarda - zdoła tego dokonać. W końcu tworzył gry i komiksy o Transformerach, nie literackie arcydzieła zakorzenione w najgłębszych tradycjach kultury... Niemniej... chciałbym, by mu się udało...

* http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Metzen
 Strona:  ««  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  »» 
USS Phoenix forum / Star Trek / CBS, Paramount, Abrams, zabawki - czyli przyszłość Treka...

Twoja wypowiedź
Styl pogrubiony  Styl pochylony  Obraz Łącza  URL Łącza  :) ;) :-p :-( Więcej emotikon...  Wyłącz emotikony

» Login  » Hasło 
Tylko zarejestrowani użytkownicy mogą tutaj pisać. Zaloguj się przed napisaniem wiadomości albo zarejstruj najpierw.
 
Wygenerowane przez miniBB®


© Copyright 2001-2009 by USS Phoenix Team.   Dołącz sidebar Mozilli.   Konfiguruj wygląd.
Część materiałów na tej stronie pochodzi z oryginalnego serwisu USS Solaris za wiedzą i zgodą autorów.
Star Trek, Star Trek The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager oraz Enterprise to zastrzeżone znaki towarowe Paramount Pictures.

Pobierz Firefoksa!